Scientific Program

Day 1 :

  • Nursing | Nursing Education | Nursing Practitioner | Nursing Informatics
Speaker
Biography:

Gwen Verchota is working in Virtuwell Health Promoters located in USA and is very interested in the field of Nursing.

Abstract:

Background: The role of self-management (SM) in adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is not well understood.  Purpose: Examine the relationship of key Individual and Family Self-management Theory (IFSMT) context and process variables on proximal (self-management  behaviors [SMB]) and distal (hemoglobin A1c [HgbA1c] and diabetes-specific health-related quality of life [DQOL]) outcomes in adolescents with T1DM.  Methods: A correlational, cross-sectional study was undertaken to identify factors contributing to outcomes in adolescents with T1DM and further examine potential direct and mediating relationships that exist between context, process, and outcome variables delineated in the IFSMT.  Participants included 103 adolescent-parent dyads (adolescents aged 12-17 years with T1DM) from a Midwest outpatient diabetes clinic.  The dyads each completed a self-report survey including instruments intended to measure context, process, and outcome variables from the IFSMT.  Results:  Using hierarchical multiple regression, context (depressive symptoms) and process (communication) variables explained 37 % of the variance in SMB.  Regimen complexity explained 11% of the variance in metabolic control.  Only regimen complexity was significant at Step 1.  Neither process variables nor SMB was significant.  For the DQOL outcome, context (regimen complexity and depressive symptoms) explained 26% of the variance at Step 1, an additional 9% of the variance was explained when process (SE and communication) variables were added at Step 2 and a total of 52% of the variance was explained when SMB were added at Step 3.  In the final model, three variables were significant: depressive symptoms, SE, and SMB.  The criteria for mediation were not met.  Conclusions: IFSMT can serve as a cogent theory for understanding key concepts, processes, and outcomes essential to SM in adolescents and families dealing with T1DM. 

Rohini Mehta

American College of Nursing, USA

Title: Cultural is important in healthcare
Speaker
Biography:

Rohini A. Mehta I am a quality and performance director for Castle family health clinics. Nurse educator for American college of Nursing have worked in the health care field for a little over thirty years. Licensed vocational nurse with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Information Systems. Certified lactation educator, Certified in Six Sigma green Belt. Board member for Charitable Care Foundation. NCQA and ASQ Graduate (BS) University of Phoenix 

Abstract:

The United States of America has been a kaleidoscope of cultures for hundreds of years. This has never been truer than it is today, as people from every corner of the globe continue to seek out a life in the U.S., whether permanently or temporarily.The multicultural makeup of the U.S.-especially in metropolitan areas-presents special challenges for medical professionals, whose job requires relating to patients on a very personal level. In urban areas it is not unusual for a doctor to have a diverse patient lineup-seeing a patient in the morning who recently emigrated from the Philippines, a multi-generational family of Indian descent later in the afternoon, and a tourist from China in the evening might be a typical day for some in the healthcare profession. Even doctors and nurses who work in rural areas will inevitably encounter people of various ethnicities and cultural backgrounds in their careers, especially as the U.S. countryside continues to become more ethnically and racially diverse.Sensitivity, compassion, understanding, and acceptance of patients with different values, beliefs, and behaviors are essential qualities for those who work in the medical arena. 

Speaker
Biography:

Ghadir Mohammad Almusa is an Intern student at the College of Nursing, King Saud bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences KSA

Abstract:

Background: Female youth students with decreased nutritional state perform less than male youth student. Malnutrition during early life inhibits normal growth and affects mental developmental, and also decrease the motivation and the energy level which results in the reduction of the academic performance.Objectives: this study aimed to identify the nutritional profile of female health science students in Riyadh. Setting: College of Nursing (females only) and College of Medicine (females only) affiliated to king Saud bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences – Riyadh, Saudia Arabia were included in the study.Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Subjects:  Convenience samples of 100 students from the college of nursing and 72 students from the college of medicine were included. All students who were present at their college at the time of data collection were included in the study, giving a total number of 172 female students. Inclusion criteria: female student, enrolled in one of the above mentioned colleges, age between 18 and 28 years old, free from any chronic illness, not pregnant or breastfeeding, free from any physical disability and agreed voluntarily to participate in the study. Two tools were used for data collection: Youth student's bio-socio-demographic and lifestyle structured interview schedule and youth student's nutrition profile.Results: Medicine students tends to have higher BMI than nursing students as slightly less than one quarter (22.0%) of the nursing students were underweight compared to 12.5% of the medicine students, and, 14% of the nursing students were overweight compared to almost one fifth (20.8%) of the medicine students with no statistically significant difference. Significant correlation was depicted between headache and BMI (X2=11.673, P=0.015), and highly significant correlation was found between loss of appetite and BMI of the assessed students (X2=17.988, P=0.004). In addition, body mass index of the study sample was significantly associated with academic achievement (X2= 2.270, P=0.024). Recommendations: Students need to have strategic college-based nutritional program including nutrition education and physical activity which is expected to be reflected on better academic performance.  

Speaker
Biography:

Panomprai Sitthiwongsa is working as a Specialized Nursing  Faculty of Medicine at Khon Kaen University in Thailand

Abstract:

This descriptive research aim to study the knowledge and performance of aids’ patients with Cytomegalovirus retinitis received intravitreous Gancyclovir. The samples  all of AIDS who have  Cytomegalovirus retinitis received intravitreous Gancyclovir 40 sample in out patient eye department, Srinagarind Hospital from July 2014 to December 2014. Collecting data by using a questionnaire include of general data, knowledge and performance of  practices of HIV AIDS who have  Cytomegalovirus retinitis received intravitreous Gancyclovir. Led to the conviction of the coefficients of Cronbach alpha (Cronbach's alpha co-efficient) for the 0.76 confidence. Data were analyzed by using frequency, percentage, average and standard deviation.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Tyler Traster is a Graduate Assistant and is pursuing his Doctorate in Nursing 

Abstract:

The health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people has recently become a national health priority. The National Institute of Health (NIH) declared LGBTQ communities a health disparity population in October of 2016 (NIH, 2016). Many advances in policy (same-sex marriage, visitation rights, etc.) and societal shifts have allowed for increased visibility of this community in our society, but has healthcare and nursing kept up? In 2011, then Secretary of State, Hillary Rodham-Clinton discussed how LGBT rights are human rights and that health advocates, researchers, and practitioners engage in a “more proactive role in bridging health disparity among the “invisible minority” (Lim et al, 2013, p. 198)”. The National Institutes of Health designated the LGBTQ community as a “health disparity population” for research, citing provider knowledge and attitudes as one of the key areas needing further research.Within nursing curricula and research, heterosexual bias still exists that diminishes LGBTQ nursing care. From 2005 to 2009, only eight out of 5,000 nursing articles where published that focused on LGBTQ health issues (Strong & Folse, 2015). The Department of Health and Human Services found that the LGBTQ population is at an increased risk of suicide, depression, HIV infection, sexually transmitted diseases, obesity, and alcohol and drug abuse (Traynor, 2016). What further exacerbates these health disparities is that LGBTQ patients also face minority stress – “stress that is experienced by individuals from stigmatized social categories as a result of inferior social status (Strong & Folse, 2015, p. 45)”. One of the largest barriers to culturally congruent LGBTQ care is the lack of knowledge on LGBTQ people and possible negative attitudes among nurses and providers (Strong & Folse, 2015).The purpose of this study is to establish a baseline understanding of the knowledge and attitude of registered nurses about LGBTQ people as well as measure the impact of a newly designed educational intervention on their knowledge and attitudes. The research questions guiding this project are 1) what is are the existing levels of knowledge and attitude that inpatient registered nurses have about the LGBTQ community and 2) what is the impact newly designed LGBTQ focused educational intervention on inpatient registered nurses’ knowledge and attitudes?

Speaker
Biography:

Gryan Garcia is an advanced practice registered nurse in Toronto, Canada. He obtained his Master of Science in Nursing focusing in aging and frailty in 2015 at the University of Phoenix, concurrently his Master of Science in Community Health focusing in wound care management at the University of Toronto in 2017. He is a certified geriatric nurse, emergency nurse, and psychiatric/mental health nurse by the Canadian Nurses Association, including a national certification as wound care consultant. His primary research interest are: geriatric medicine; geriatric emergency; advanced wound care; infection control; and public policy. Gryan has been involved to numerous quality improvement strategies in Canada such as falls prevention; assessment and management of delirium, dementia, and depression; management of aggressive behavior; and most recently in advanced wound care among the geriatric population in the Emergency Department.

 

Abstract:

Aim: The aim of this study is to understand and present the cost-benefit analysis of Geriatric Emergency Management [GEM] nursing in expanding the scope of practice involving advanced wound care management catering to the geriatric population (65 years and older) visiting the Emergency Department.
Method: The researcher surveyed 43 frontline clinical staff, and each patient flow leaders regarding their point of view (research variables) of immediate wound care management by an Advanced Practice Clinician in the Emergency Department both in hospital X and Y improving patient flow and navigation, patient experience, and the clinician self-actualization for the expanded scope of practice. Results: Those patients who received GEM referral for wound care management waited a minimum of 1.5 hours and a maximum of 4 hours wait time at a median rate of 2.4 hours. While those patients who received a CNS referral waited a minimum of 6 hours and a maximum of 24 hours wait time at a median rate of 13.8 hours. In addition, “patient experience, outcomes, and satisfaction” received almost an equal percentage (49 - 51%) this perhaps is due to the same level of education and experience both the GEM/Wound Care and CNS/Wound Care have. But there was a huge difference between “patient wait times” if seen by a GEM/Wound Care (90% improvement) or CNS/Wound Care (10% improvement). Implication: The implications of this initiative if implemented in any acute care hospital can: (1) improve patient satisfaction: less waiting and better service leads to satisfied patients; (2) improve quality of care: standard work and improved flow reduce staff stress and minimizes the risk of patients decompensating or having patients leave before they receive treatment. (3) reduce total cost through higher utilization: more patients can be serviced within the same physical space and without an increase in staff. Overall, hospitals that engage staff in an improvement effort can derive substantial cost, quality, and patient satisfaction benefits.

Speaker
Biography:

Francis Kyerepagr Kobekyaa is a student at University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Abstract:

Background: Collaborative clinical facilitation is indispensable to the quality of clinical learning experience and the professional practice of nursing and midwifery students. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore and describe the knowledge level of nurse educators, preceptors, clinical nurses/midwives and nursing and midwifery students on the perceived collaborative clinical facilitation at two selected nursing and midwifery colleges and a hospital in the Upper West Region of Ghana. Methodology: This study adopted a pragmatic paradigm using a convergent parallel mixed methods approach. Purposive and systematic sampling methods were utilized in selecting participants for the study. Quantitative data was collected using a self-report questionnaire and the data analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Focus groups and in-depth interviews were used to gather data for the qualitative phase of the study and analysed using Framework Analysis Method. Results and findings: The qualitative findings showed that nurse educators, preceptors and clinical nurses and midwives conceptualised collaborative clinical facilitation as a space for team teaching, where all the relevant key role players in clinical nursing education engaged in a tight node of interpersonal relationships to providing comprehensive support and guidance to nursing and midwifery students during their clinical practice. The students on the other hand viewed it as a vehicle for gaining self-autonomy in their clinical practice, and a platform for promoting the application of theory into practice in real-life situations. The quantitative results demonstrated that nurse educators, preceptors and clinical nurses/midwives had sufficient knowledge of collaborative clinical facilitation compared to the nursing and midwifery students.Conclusion: The clinical learning experiences of nursing and midwifery students require an effective collaborative partnership of all key role players pooling their expertise together to producing polyvalent, well-educated and professionally skilled nurses and midwives for the health care system.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Salwa Obeisat is working in Jordan University of Science and Technology , Jordan

Abstract:

Obesity had become a global issue and a major public health concern, because of its impact on the public health. Obstetric and midwifery evidences reported that maternal obesity an important issue, because of its associated complications like: obstructed labors, infections and hemorrhage. People who are obese are often stigmatized and blamed for their weight. Health care providers are not immune to obesity-related prejudice and the literature features several examples of their negative attitudes towards obese patients. In Jordan, few studies were conducted to investigate obesity prevalence rate and its associated factors. The purposes of this study were to assess the health care providers' attitudes toward overweight and obese women during the childbirth in the North of Jordan, and to investigate the relationships between health care providers' socio-demographic characteristics and their attitudes. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was utilized. A convenient sample was consisted of 95 midwives, 30 nurses and 62 obstetricians, who were working in the labor rooms. A self-administered questionnaire consisted of three sections: demographical data, Arabic version of Fat Phobia Scale (FPS), and Arabic version of Nurses' Attitudes toward Obesity and Obese Patients Scale (NATOOPS). Results: The study findings revealed that the majority of Jordanian health care providers held negative attitudes toward overweight and obese women during childbirth. Midwives held less negative attitudes than did obstetricians and nurses. The majority of participants were perceived the overweight and obese pregnant women during childbirth as overate people, shapeless, slow and unattractive. Age, specialty, education and years of experience were found to be associated with health care providers’ attitudes. The conclusion: health care providers negative attitudes toward overweight and obese pregnant women, are a cause for concern. Therefore, maternal obesity was needed to be more adequately addressed in basic education courses, and in the continuing professional education classes of practicing health care providers.

  • Cardiovascular Nursing | Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing | Surgical Nursing
Speaker
Biography:

Azjargal Baatar has completed her MSN at the age of 38 years from Mongolian National Unversity of Medical Sciences and doctor studies from Monglian National University of Medical Sciences . She is the Head of  Department Maternal & Child Nursing of School of Nursing, MNUMS. She has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals in Mongolia and has been serving as an editorial board member of CAJMS CAJMS. 

Abstract:

Objectives:The goal of study is to define the relation between nursing diagnosis and some physiological (hemodynamic) changes during arterial hypertension. Materials and methodsWe prepared questionnaire about 5 steps of nursing activities for completing by nurses, who work in the district hospitals and family health centers and we collected information from this. We used SPSS17 program for analyzing results of survey.Results:1. Nurses provide just the nursing assessment stage by defining complains, and symptoms and nursing planning, implementation stage, but not complete sufficiently the nursing activities by nursing diagnosis. 2. During the study collected from the nursing chart and nurses notes we defined that nurses diagnosed in 57.4% of patients with arterial hypertension edema, in 43.3% dyspnoea, in 14.6% chest pain, in 5.9% palpitation, in 1.4% cough, in 1.5% blooding from nose, in 1.5% confusion, 1.5% restricted movement. It shows that nurses mostly diagnosed some hemodynamic changes during the hypertension.3. During the study collected from the hospitals chart patients’ and nurses notes we determined that nurses diagnosed by asking questions in 21.7% of patients with arterial hypertension dyspnoea, in 63% chronic headache and posterior neck pain, in 17.2% blurring vision , in 17.2% , in 8.7% fatigue, 11.3% anxiety, 17.2% sleep disorder.Conclusion: 1.It is understandable that, nursing diagnosis based on subjective and objective methods of patients’ assessment. 2.Assessment made by asking questions, physical examination of patients with arterial hypertension mostly defined symptoms of functional dysfunction of cardiovascular system like dyspnoea, edema, chest pain, peripheral cyanosis, hypertrophy left ventricular, and these symptoms can be theoretical and methodological aspects of nursing diagnosis. 3. Symptoms, first and secondary risk factors of arterial hypertension defined by laboratory investigations, asking questions, physical examination (increased level of blood sugar, cholesterol, triglycerides, decreased level of LDLP, increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure). 

Speaker
Biography:

Jamel Hajji is a Professor of Nursing from University of Tunis at Tunisia.

Abstract:

Today, the training center represents an unavoidable passage in the career of the high-level footballer. Training centers are among the mechanisms of Na- tional Technical Direction, to develop Tunisian football, and to improve per- formance in youth categories. The objective of our study is to examine the coping strategies of the competition, solicited by the elites affiliated to the re- gional training centers of the Tunisian Football Federation (TFF) and evaluate the interaction effects of coaching, experience, and the technical position. 76 U15 football players regularly evaluated through high-stakes competitions are invited in one hour after the competition, to settle against the Arabic version of the inventory of coping strategies of the sporting competition. Data were collected and analyzed by SPSS IBM and AMOS version 21.0.0. The results suggest that mental distraction is the coping strategy most solicited by our participants, the MANOVA analysis, only disclosed the effect of the coaching factor on mental imagery, thought control, Effort expenditure and Relaxation, but regression analysis revealed no strong explanatory relationship. Overall, this study allowed us to deepen our knowledge about the coping strategies of the competition used in the preformation process in the different training centers of the TFF. In addition, the impact of experience, coaching and the specificity of the technical position, on the choice of these strategies in com- petitive contexts.

Speaker
Biography:

Navita Rahim has completed her PostRNBScN in 2012 from Aga khan University School of Nursing and Midwifery (AKUSONAM) Karachi, Pakistan. Beside this, she has completed Diploma in Midwifery from Aga khan Maternal and Child Health center in 2004. She is the Clinical Trainer at Jhpiego Pakistan. She has worked more than five years in reputed organization and has been serving for Maternal and Child health. She has worked for 4 years with international Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) to improve Family Planning quality services in Low socio economic areas of Pakistan for the betterment of maternal life and decrease Maternal Mortality rate (MMR).

Abstract:

Holistic care is a comprehensive model of caring and proper guidance. Use of Family Planning (FP) services is still a question mark nowadays. One MWRA (Married women of reproductive age) in four (4) has an unmet need for contraception, which is the highest such rate in the region. Meeting unmet need for limiting can be accomplish by increasing the holistic approach, for family planning, three major components can be highlighted: Supply, the enabling environment and demand.  Up take of Family planning services can be enhance, more successful and sustainable if multifaceted determinates included in interventions. Availability and quality of services and other supply-related issues is a major factor for not availing FP services. Improvement in family planning cannot be achieve without quality services. Quality is consider good when adequate infrastructure, supplies, and equipment are in place, and when well- trained, skilled, motivated, and supported staff are available. Besides that, an enabling environment for health-seeking behavior is another factor for increasing services. An enabling environment requires adequate resources; effective leadership, management, and accountability. Engagement of governments, communities, and other members of civil society is critical to fostering an enabling environment. Furthermore, Improve knowledge of Family planning and cultivate a demand for services. The demand for FP exists in different forms: actual use and latent demand. The latter exists among those who wish to avoid pregnancy but are not currently using FP (those with an unmet need for FP) and those who might wish to avoid pregnancy. Holistic, client-centered approaches is the only way to make FP programming effective and successful ultimately support health system. 

Speaker
Biography:

Karimeh mousa Alnuaimi holds a position in Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan

Abstract:

Aim: To compare pregnancy outcomes of Syrian refugee women and Jordanian women. Background and introduction: The current conflict in Syria continues to displace thousands to neighboring countries, including Jordan. Pregnant refugee women are therefore facing many difficulties are known to increase the prevalence of poor reproductive health outcomes and antenatal complications. However, there is very little awareness of whether Syrian refugee women have different risks of pregnancy outcomes than Jordanian women. Methods: Using a retrospective cohort design, we examined pregnancy outcomes for Syrian refugee (N = 616) and Jordanian women (N = 644) giving birth at two governmental Hospitals in the north of Jordan, between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2014. A checklist of 13 variables was utilized. The primary outcome measures were delivery by Caesarean section, maternal complications, low birth weight (< 2500 g), Apgar score and preterm delivery (< 37 weeks' gestational age). Results: Statistical analysis revealed that refugee mothers had a significant increase in the rate of caesarean section and higher rate of anemia, a lower neonates’ weight and Apgar scores when compared to their Jordanian counterparts. Discussion and Conclusion: Results were congruent with findings from other studies in the region and worldwide. Minimizing inequalities in pregnancy outcomes between Syrian refugees and Jordan women is a health care priority. Implications for nursing and health policy: The findings could guide the planning and development of health policies in Jordan that would help to alleviate the situation regarding refugee populations. Action is required by the policy makers, specifically targeting public and primary health care services, to address the problem of adequately meeting the need for antenatal care of this vulnerable population. 

Day 2 :

  • Occupational Health Nursing | Pediatric Nursing & Neonatal Nursing | Cancer/Oncology Nursing | Healthcare

Session Introduction

Ruba Al Jaber

Dubai Health Authority, UAE

Title: The vital role of occupational health nurses and the challenges facing them
Speaker
Biography:

Ms. Ruba Al Jaber is a senior staff nurse since 2001.Graduated from institute of Nursing - Dubai, and got a master professional diploma in Strategy & Development-City & Guilds University-UK, currently studying NEBOSH international Diploma for Occupational Health & Safety. Undertaken the role of occupational health nurse and had significant contributions to OH services. Actively involved in PCI committee/Occupational health committee/Wellness Promotion committee. Conducts surveillance and monitors staff compliance for follow up of:

  • Needle stick injury/mucous membrane exposure/staff injury
  • HCWs vaccinations.
  • Communicable disease exposure

Participated as Speaker in:

  • In-service nursing education programme on monthly basis about Occupational Health programme
  • Nursing Role in Management of HIV Patient, March/2009.
  • Occupational Health Overview in Hospital Quality Meeting January/2015
  • Infection control link nurses programme & Hospital Orientation Programme.

 

Abstract:

Occupational health nurses play many roles, in­cluding but not limited to clinician, manager, educa­tor, researcher, consultant, and case manager. These roles may be played independently or integrated into the health care team through collabora­tion with other disciplines’ professionals. Professional activities may include health protection, health promo­tion, or both, designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers’ quality of life, and be cost-effective for the organization (Graeve, McGov­ern, Nachreiner, & Ayers, 2014; Henke et al., 2010).In addition occupational health services, provided at the workplace to address the health care needs of working populations have been identified as an important component of the public health strategy. These services can also make a significant contribution to other government initiatives, such as; reducing health inequalities, reducing social exclusion and sickness absence, and by protecting and promoting the health of the working population occupational health services can help to reduce the overall burden of ill health. Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). In this presentation the main topic is the vital role of occupational health nurse according to WHO role definition and the challenges facing this profession. 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Fatmah Alsharif is an Assistant Professor of Nursing.  She currently serves as the at the Department of Medical and Surgical, College of Nursing, King Abdulaziz University. Her research interest is in the areas of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Oncology, Symptom Distress, and Health related Quality of Life. She is specializing in teaching the undergraduate nursing students related to fundamental of nursing. She has an experience in quantitative methods research. Her pervious study was to explore the use of complementary and alternative medicine by women with breast cancer in Saudi Arabia. Dr. Alsharif is particularly interested in the Saudi population. She holds a Bachelor of nursing degree (2008),  Master of Nursing degree from Case Western Reserve University, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing (2014), and PhD in Nursing degree from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA (2017). She is an active member Sigma Theta Tau International and Honor Society of Nursing

Abstract:

Breast cancer is a significant problem and is the main cause of cancer-related mortality in Saudi Arabia. It is estimated that the agestandardized incidence rate for breast cancer was 22.4 per 100,000 women in 2008, and the age-standardized mortality rate was 10.4 per 100,000 women. Symptom distress is common and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is negatively impacted. Although the use of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy is common among breast cancer patients in the US, the use among women with breast cancer in Saudi Arabia is not well understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the association among the types of CAM use, the demographic, and clinical factors among women with breast cancer in Saudi Arabia. The Symptom Management Theory was used to guide this study. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used and convenience sample of 85 women with breast cancer who were undergoing active cancer treatments was obtained from the in the oncology department at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The Use of Complementary Therapies Survey (UCTS) was used to measure CAM use. SPSS was used to run descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate analyses was used to explore relationships among the types of CAM use, the demographic, and clinical factors. The findings show that all women had used at least three methods of CAM. The personal characteristics can influence symptom management strategies (CAM use). Positive correlations between time since diagnosis and specific CAM types maybe explained that’s some types were explained by low cost. The results of this study will guide future studies examining the efficacy of CAM on symptom management in Saudi Arabian women with breast cancer. These findings will serve as basis for future research examining CAM use in symptom management of breast cancer and other types of cancer.

Speaker
Biography:

Experienced Chief Nursing Officer with a demonstrated history of healthcare subject matter expertise working in the computer software industry. Skilled in Healthcare Management, Hospital operations, Patient experience, Customer Service, Nursing Education, and Board certified in Obstetrics. Holds a BSN and MSN and entering the dissertation phase of her Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) focused in Nursing Education from Capella University.

Abstract:

Health information technology (HIT) offers hospitals and healthcare systems the tools that integrate data from a clinical, financial, and operational perspective that yields analytical insight into their healthcare organizations. Leveraging technology to manage labor costs can be used by collecting the data from the electronic medical records that drive clinical staffing and clinical assignments to deliver superior patient, clinical and financial outcomes. Technology can be leveraged by healthcare organizations as they pursue the Quadruple Aim, which includes adding the goal of improving the work life of health care providers, comprising clinicians and staff, as well as seeking better cost, quality and outcomes. This allows for an increase in the coordination of care across all continuums.Healthcare organizations need a strategic clinical and operational plan to assist them in their efforts to optimize patient outcomes, improve employee satisfaction and maximize revenue. This can be accomplished by leveraging technology to increase the care coordination received in patient care. Implementing a solution will allow your organization to operate at maximum efficiency. Increased engagement with the patient throughout their continuum of care and increased communication amongst the entire healthcare team leads to better patient outcomes.The increasing advances and development of technology in health care offer the opportunity for increased availability of data to drive operations and the potential to support evidence-based management decisions (Hyun, et al, 2008). As challenges continue to rise, there is an enormous opportunity to leverage technology to provide better patient care to patients and improve clinical outcomes using real time, actionable data.Combining the best science-driven processes with patented technology and years of experience provides a solution that allows you to decrease turnover, improve performance, streamline hiring processes, and reduce risk.

Speaker
Biography:

Nasrin Elahi is working as an Assistance Professor of Nursing Care Research Center  in Chronic Disease in Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences Ahvaz situated at  Iran.
 

Abstract:

Background & aim: Diabetes is the most common metabolic disease in the world that in the absence of appropriate controls it could results in significant morbidity and mortality. Appropriate Blood sugar controlling measures could reduce or delay the onset and progression of diabetes complications. Considering the importance of providing cares for diabetic patients that has been implied by the American Diabetes Association, this study was conducted to check the status of the diabetes cares provided in the Ahvaz diabetes clinics. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted by convenient sampling Method on 296 diabetic patients referred to the diabetes clinics in the Ahvaz. Data was collected from patients through questionnaires, medical records and blood A1C hemoglobin measurement through a blood test. Data was analyzed using SPSS software (version 21) with a significance level of less than 0.05 and descriptive statistics, Paired t-test and chi-square. Results: The results showed that the majority of patients (70.9%) were women in the age range of 80-56 years (76.8%). A large percentage (79%) of patient has high blood pressure but only45.3% of them were taking ASA. the 83.8% of people has high blood fat, and most of them (66.8%) had non-standard hemoglobin A1C. The annual examination of the heart (ECG) and eye exams was done in 70.9% and 82.4% of patients respectively. But a small percentage of patients, 18.2% and 29% respectively, underwent neurological examination and foot examination. Kidney tests and measurement of blood fat and blood were done in 82.4%, 98.6% and 89.9% of patients, respectively. Conclusion: Despite the desirability of the care provided in most cases and their compliance with the international standards of American Diabetes Association, we see lacks of proper control of blood glucose in these patients. As a result, the evaluation of the quality of cares provided at the national level, introducing appropriate solutions, as well as relying on the necessity of patient and health workers adherence with the medical cares are suggested to improvement of the health status of individuals.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Hussam AL-Nusair has completed his PhD in hospital administration from Nottingham University/UK and Master Degree in Advancing Critical Care from Kings College London/UK. He is the Chief Nursing Officer for Sheikh Khalifa Hospital Um Alquwain since 2016, prior to this in UK as chief nursing officer for over 6 years, and Chief Nursing Officer in Riyadh for 8 years. He has published more than 4 papers in reputed journals. Hussam Al Nusair have over 25 years of experience in the nursing field, his main interest is around staff engagement and recognition.

Abstract:

Having the right number of the right nurses is of course an important first step in ensuring that patient care is delivered in the most cost effective, quality-driven manner. However, overall engagement of these qualified staff members also plays an important role in improving quality across a health system. A wide variety of peer-reviewed studies, patient surveys, and data-driven reports have documented the impact nurses have on both patient satisfaction and health outcomes. For instance, a recent study showed that nurse engagement is the number one predictor of mortality variation across hospitals. This means that it’s not enough for hospitals to simply add more staff; instead, they must look closely at the engagement levels of current staff in order to maintain optimal care practices. Patient feedback solicited through other surveys has also documented the importance of nurses in the overall care experience. A peer-reviewed clinical study concluded that patient ratings of nursing care have the most direct correlation with ratings of overall quality of care and services. This demonstrates that when a less-thanengaged nurse has a poor interaction with a patient, the patient’s entire care experience can easily be tainted, regardless of his or her health outcome. In addition, surveys from both nurses and patients showed that patients cared for on units characterized as having adequate staff, good administrative support for nursing care, and good relations between doctors and nurses were more than twice as likely as other patients to report high satisfaction with their care.While much of this support happens “behind the scenes” of care practices, this is yet another direct link between the work environment of nurses and patient satisfaction. In fact, a Press Ganey report shows that while some aspects of nurse staffing, such as hours of care and skill mix, certainly influence outcomes, the work environment of nurses has a much more significant influence across most metrics. Hospital performance on patient experience scores within value-based purchasing models also increased with improved work environments for nurses. These facts provide substantial evidence for the idea that allocating time and resources to promote happier, more engaged nurses can deliver a measurable return on investment for hospitals. In addition to its clear impact on care quality and patient satisfaction, existing evidence also demonstrates the relationship between increased revenue, cost savings, and nurse retention. According to the Journal of Nursing Administration, when low engagement leads to nurse dissatisfaction and a lack of retention, hospitals will incur costs upwards of $82,000 to recruit one new nurse. That figure covers vacancy, orientation and training, the lowered productivity of a newly hired nurse, and advertising and recruiting costs. Other studies show that retaining just one nurse and utilizing the recommended nurse-patient ratios may result in savings of approximately $140,000 every year.

Speaker
Biography:

Shalani Andria, the Transformational Health Industry Analyst at Frost & Sullivan is a subject matter expert in Asia Pacific digital health market with thought leadership covering broad range of sectors within the digital health market including Video Telemedicine, Mobile Health, Remote Patient Monitoring, Home Care, Healthcare IT, Healthcare Big Data Analytics, Healthcare Interoperability and Internet of Medical Things. Shalani has extensive experience in strategy consulting, merger & acquisition, and public-private partnerships. She has advised top telehealth vendors, healthcare IT vendors, medical device vendors, hospital groups, and ministries on disruptive technologies, business model innovation, and sustainable ecosystem. She has been quoted in multiple industry magazines and journals. 

Abstract:

Asia-Pacific (APAC) is moving from centralized to decentralized care-delivery models, with the need for efficient healthcare services outside the hospital. There has been an increase in demand for remote patient monitoring (RPM) devices by both healthcare providers and consumers in the home but adoption and adherence is low. The major roadblock is funding for high-tech devices and care management platforms. Some of the key challenges include:

  • Absence of sustainable business models due to under-developed healthcare regulations and reimbursement mechanisms
  • Lack of an ecosystem strategy that includes sustainable partnerships between telecommunication providers, healthcare providers, insurance companies, governments or others for home monitoring.

Failure to address these challenges result in inability to monetize home health monitoring solutions, although the market is packed with unexplored opportunities. This presentation will highlight some innovative business models that address these issues, and educate stakeholders on how and why the models are successful.

Speaker
Biography:

Trisha Iacobucci is an Assistant Professor of Nursing, Lakeland Community College under Hillcrest Hospital- Pediatric ED located in USA

Abstract:

Background: Pediatric emergency refresher courses are commonly developed with the narrow focus of addressing critical assessments and algorithmic “hands on care” related to acute emergencies. While this area of professional development has shown to be vital to the management of pediatric emergency care, there remains a scarcity of research demonstrating the impact refresher education aimed at improving the ‘soft skill’ competencies have on the increasingly valued outcomes of patient centered care and patient satisfaction. The Relationship-Based Care (RBC) practice model (Koloroutis, 2004) emphasizes this premise as a method for developing caring interdisciplinary relationships that support quality patient care experiences.  There is a gap throughout literature review related to staff development initiatives related to RBC ‘soft skills’ for emergency care providers working with children and families. As a result, the Pediatric Emergency Care Refresher Course© was piloted with the goal of improving the RBC soft skills of ED care providers in effort to improve the measurable unit outcomes related to patient satisfaction. Action Taken: Fourteen ED’s within a large international healthcare system were identified as having a need for RBC ‘soft skill’ staff development training.   Principles of pediatric growth and development, interdisciplinary teamwork, atraumatic care, and family centered communication strategies were developed into a Pediatric Emergency Care Refresher© course using concepts from Adult Learner Theory (Knowles, Holton, & Swanson, 2015) and the RBC practice model (Koloroutis, 2004).  Voluntary registration for the 2.83 contact hour course was offered to all members of the enterprise and was delivered in face-to-face format by two certified pediatric emergency nurses.  Sessions incorporated active learning strategies such as role play and case study, as well as rich discussion. Outcomes and Takeaways:A total of 38 ED care providers, representing four separate ED locations, attended the course. The majority of participants were identified as ED Registered Nurses (89%, n=34) with ED clinical experience ranging from less than 6 months to more than 15 years.  Participants reported having met all course objectives (n=38, 100%). Small class size, and rich dialogue among participants resulted in collegial problem solving using application of the RBC principles of care to relatable clinical situations. Summarized subjective feedback indicates participants gained increase confidence and communication skills related to the emergency care of children and their families. Future course development is needed to investigate course attendance has on measures of patient satisfaction.